You are here

Broadcom Chats Up “Wearables” at SF Event, Sees New Applications on Horizon | Cypress Semiconductor

Broadcom Chats Up “Wearables” at SF Event, Sees New Applications on Horizon

There’s plenty of excitement here at Broadcom — and across the tech industry, it seems — about an emerging class of products that fall under the category of connected “wearables.”


Tech journalists meet with Broadcom CEO Scott McGregor for a roundtable session about the future of wearables.

Things like Internet-connected smart watches and health monitors are just a few of the more familiar iterations that are building buzz.

This week, Broadcom channeled some of that excitement by inviting a number of technology journalists, bloggers and analysts to a San Francisco venue to talk about the technology that’s powering up-and-coming wearables and showcase partners that are breaking through into new products and product categories.Broadcom Chief Executive Scott McGregor held a media roundtable, and reporters had a chance to check out demos from a handful of innovative startups that have partnered with Broadcom to create new Wi-Fi enabled products.

Previously: Exploring WICED’s Wearables: The Open Frontier of the Internet of Things

Among those in attendance were ZDNet’s Rachel King, who noted that Broadcom’s introduction of a new Wi-Fi framework for embedded devices — a news announcement that went out earlier this week —  positions the company as one of the first entrants into a “new segment in smart, as well as mobile, computing [that] is about to burst.”


Ashok Sabata of Aginova offers a demo to PCMag’s Damon Poeter.

Likewise, Hubert Nguyen at Ubergizmo noted that “today’s smart devices still require too much setup and synchronization, but a platform like WICED opens more communications options and extends the range at which things can communicate with the Internet.”

At the end of the day, for a company like Broadcom, an event like this reinforces the importance of connectivity. Noting that the company’s chips are believed to touch 99.98 percent of all data traffic and live in 75 percent of all cell phones, CNET’s Dan Farber declared that “Broadcom is the king of wireless connectivity.”

View photos from the event on Facebook.

Because the technology is new and, for the most part, still focused on niche products, it was important for Broadcom to not only explain the technology and where it’s going but to also showcase partners who are using it in innovative ways.


Broadcom partner iDevices demo’d WICED-enabled products.

Consider, for example, what the team at iDevices LLC announced at Broadcom’s media event. The My Virtual Closet app on a smartphone communicates with a piece of clothing via an embedded disk on the item, perhaps in the tag, to help the user to build outfits with it or even gathering information such as when it was last worn.

Or take the iCelsius from Broadcom partner Aginova Inc., which demonstrated its Wi-Fi-enabled temperature probe, which could potentially help backyard BBQers to remotely monitor the meat on the grill or the food safety industry to operate more efficiently.

The beauty of an event like this for a company like Broadcom is that it creates an early opportunity for those who report the latest headlines around technology breakthroughs to truly understand what the possibilities are for the future, instead of focusing on the latest gadget. Sure, those can be fun – but they’re not for everyone.

During a segment of CNBC’s Squawk Box this week, All Things D’s Ina Fried, who also attended the event, noted that the question around wearables is not who will be first to market, as some of those are already out. “The question is ‘Can they be first with something that a large number of people actually want to wear?” Fried said.

With technology breakthroughs such as what Broadcom is offering, the potential for a new mass market product lines is greater. Essentially, it’s an open frontier and it’s anyone’s game.

To join the conversation, follow along on Twitter using the hashtag #GetWICED.

More News:

Blog: 

ALL CONTENT AND MATERIALS ON THIS SITE ARE PROVIDED "AS IS". CYPRESS SEMICONDUCTOR AND ITS RESPECTIVE SUPPLIERS MAKE NO REPRESENTATIONS ABOUT THE SUITABILITY OF THESE MATERIALS FOR ANY PURPOSE AND DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES AND CONDITIONS WITH REGARD TO THESE MATERIALS, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES AND CONDITIONS OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, TITLE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY THIRD PARTY INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHT. NO LICENSE, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, BY ESTOPPEL OR OTHERWISE, IS GRANTED BY CYPRESS SEMICONDUCTOR. USE OF THE INFORMATION ON THIS SITE MAY REQUIRE A LICENSE FROM A THIRD PARTY, OR A LICENSE FROM CYPRESS SEMICONDUCTOR.

Content on this site may contain or be subject to specific guidelines or limitations on use. All postings and use of the content on this site are subject to the Terms and Conditions of the site; third parties using this content agree to abide by any limitations or guidelines and to comply with the Terms and Conditions of this site. Cypress Semiconductor and its suppliers reserve the right to make corrections, deletions, modifications, enhancements, improvements and other changes to the content and materials, its products, programs and services at any time or to move or discontinue any content, products, programs, or services without notice.