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Never "get" a real job, make one instead | Cypress Semiconductor

Never "get" a real job, make one instead

Author Scott Gerber has written a book Never get a "Real" Job and you can see his presentation (more of an advert) here: (portal.sliderocket.com/Scott-Gerber/Never-Get-a-Real-Job). While his advice is for new college grads on how to become entrepreneurs, what about those of us who already have jobs? Besides jumping ship, can we learn anything from him? You bet your life!

Scott Gerber is a "Gen Y-er" and writes to Gen Y-ers, a group suffering from high unemployment and low job satisfaction. His message is "you have been lied to, getting a "real" job is a dead-end; learn to hire interns not how to be one". What is most interesting is that this message has cycled and re-cycled over-and over for each "generation" of youth entering the job market. Last catchy presentation of this I heard was "become you.com" at the turn of the millenium. It is as true today as it was when I finished school at the trailing edge of the Baby Boom when I heard a similar mantra: "Make the job you want".

The reality is, we need entrepreneurial thinkers in the work force, in our companies, on our team. We need people who can look at what's on their plate and if they see lemons make lemonade, or open a lemon-exporting business or write an advertisement like "Lemons are the new orange". Every job has crap in it, but if you handle it properly it can become fertilizer.

There is one more key advantage to employing entrepreneurial people - they see opportunities everywhere. This is a huge benefit in one particular aspect - when an employee feels trapped in a job his/her performance declines, and poor performance reduces one's perception of opportunities, which increases the feeling of being trapped, which further reduces performance, and on and on. The feeling of choice or opportunity makes what one does today seem much more of a choice and when you choose something you feel better about it. 

Of course, a strong entrepreneurial spirit can also catapult someone from your team/company out on their own. But if you really care about them as a team member and person, and they are jazzed to go out on their own, you should be happy for them, even if it leaves a hole. The better that relationship the more likely the budding entrepreneur will help you fill the gap, either helping out personally or in recruiting/training a replacement. And many start-ups are built upon experience gained in previous jobs in the industry, so there is a great chance that one employee loss could turn into several millions in new business in the near future.

So one last question: what is a "real" job anyway? I'm not really sure I've ever had one.

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