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The best book for learning to program iPhone | Cypress Semiconductor

The best book for learning to program iPhone

Vacation allows for activities normal work-a-day life prevents. When you are a programming nerd that means...learning to program something new, of course. What better platform to learn than the super-popular ultra-cool iPhone?

Yes, there is a tropical paradise outside, beach, palm trees, reef, pool, etc. And make no mistake, I am out there everyday, not just looking at it from the living room window or balcony (we do have a great view from the balcony, though). I am in the water everyday with my daughter and we all start every morning with a nice walk up and down the beach. But, a nerd's gotta do what a nerd's gotta do, and programming nerds program.

I started with iPhone late last year, spending a good bit of Thanksgiving shutdown reading Apple's guides and watching the Stanford lectures (itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast). That was a good start, and with a Mac and the free SDK, it is easy to get started. There is lots of documentation provided by Apple, both primers and references, and it all gets linked into XCode, the Apple IDE. I got a little more dabbling in during Christmas break, but I was stalling, I needed a different approach, so I went looking for books.

Just before my first summer vacation (June) I got my hands on Sams Teach Yourself iPhone Application Development in 24 Hours (www.amazon.com/Teach-Yourself-iPhone-Application-Development/dp/0672330849/ref=sr_1_1) and during that vacation I got through about half the book (12 "hours" or lessons). It was the best I had seen from a step-by-step primer, but unfortunately I had to return it (late, very late) to the library. Yep, I'm too cheap to buy my own copy. but at that point I would have recommended it as the best.

Just before this (2nd) summer vacation I checked out a book I now think is the best iPhone programming book for beginners (beginners with iPhone programming, but not beginning programmers). I am now halfway through this book, and the flow is perfect, building real apps from the start (one of the first projects is a Twitter client, not a "Hello World" simple display project) and systematically building and expanding a rich, multi-featured app (the main project is a bartenders friend or DrinkMixer).

The best book? Head First iPhone Development: A Learner's Guide to Creating Objective-C Applications for the iPhone (www.amazon.com/Head-First-iPhone-Development-Applications/dp/0596803540/ref=sr_1_1).

I'll talk more next post about why I think this is the best book and why an embedded programmer can benefit from learning to program iPhone.

Hang loose!

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