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Staxi | Cypress Semiconductor

Staxi

I was at the Seattle Airport and I saw the coolest product. It was a wheel chair to move people around the airport

 

 

 

They are built like shopping carts. They are rugged and well built (As far as I can tell. The airport people wouldn’t let me flip one over for closer inspection, let alone take one apart.) I think they could easily take a tumble down a flight of stairs with no damage. They are power coated for a hard finish that resists scratches. The airline people say they are easier to load and unload, handle well, and stack like shopping carts for storage.
 
The standard wheel chairs seem to always have pieces missing with damaged Nagahide seats and backs. They are hard to store and I see the TSA people using them as chairs.  They are chrome plated and always look like they have been through the war.
 
Bluntly speaking, Staxi has built an improved people mover with shopping cart technology.
 
Why couldn’t the wheelchair companies do this? I think it is because they have a preconceived idea of what a wheelchair should be. A device sold to the handicapped but being paid with medical insurance. I am sure the management of those companies got to where they are by towing the company line. Neither lack of imagination nor an incentive to change, keeps their solutions static despite changing requirements.
 
Why did it take a SRAM company to develop a highly configurable, programmable system on a chip? Because we came in with no preconceived idea of what it should be. The micro controller companies all have 30 years of history to justify and they have a preconceived idea of what a micro based system is. Coupled with management heavily committed to the company line it makes prefect sense.
 
Before there were refrigerators there were ice boxes. There were big companies that good money selling ice. Not one of those companies got into the refrigerator business. All made good profit till the day they closed.

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