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PSoC Creator News
Sep 18, 2014

 

At Cypress we're pretty serious about customer surveys. The responses get reviewed very carefully and we try to implement many of the suggested improvements.

Sometimes though, the responses just don t make sense. I recently got a report from a customer complaining that PSoC-based applications use more code space than a competitor's MCU. I was confused because the MCU he mentioned had a Cortex-M0 core, just like the PSoC! How could the code size be significantly different?

   

I ll spare you the details of all the software installations and the hunt for suitable application code to make the all the comparisons but, after a lot of please wait do not reboot your PC and compiling, compiling, compiling, I finally figured out the root cause we needed to update our compiler!

We ship the GNU ARM toolchain with PSoC Creator. Our last big release, v3.0, was in September 2013 and it includes v4.7.3 of the GNU tools. We released a service pack, 3.0 SP1, earlier this year but we did not update the compiler tools because we do not wish to constantly force users to migrate. I tried building some applications with the new v4.8 GNU ARM toolchain and got some very surprising results.

My application was just one of my (8 task) demos that runs on top of any of our supported RTOS. I chose Micrium s uC/OS-III because it uses no library functions (eliminating compiler library optimizations from the calculation) but I could just as well have used Segger s embOS, Keil s RTX or FreeRTOS. When I crank up the code size optimization the 4.7 compiler generates 21574 bytes versus 21534 on v4.8 - a small, but potentially valuable, improvement.

What was much more telling was the difference in code size when optimization was disabled. The v4.7 compiler produces 45454 bytes to the 36710 from v4.8! That s a huge difference and very likely accounts for our customer s comment about PSoC code size.

PSoC Creator 3.1 is coming out this Fall and we re definitely updating the compiler that will ship with it!

This customer survey really woke us up to the need to update the shipping compiler. We really do read every response and it s amazing how many times we make adjustments based on the feedback. Look out for upcoming announcements about PSoC Creator 3.1, with the new compiler, and remember to respond to the surveys!

[reprinted from ARM Connected Community]

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Sep 16, 2014

You can still purchase select PSoC 4 silicon for $1.00 through the end of September.  Cypress has been offering specially-created PSoC 4 part numbers from our Cypress Webstore or our catalog partner websites (DigikeyMouserNewark) for $1; however, this special ends in two weeks at the end of the month. The special promotion part numbers are listed below:

 

Promotion MPN Base MPN

CG799AA

CY8C4245LQI-483

CG8000AA

CY8C4245AXI-483

CG8001AA

CY8C4245PVI-482

 

Now is a great time to purchase your first PSoC 4 silicon for your prototype and accelerate your design to production.

 

This price is only valid through the specified catalog distributors. These special part numbers do not reflect in the Cypress Quoting System and cannot be quoted by any other distributor.

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Aug 20, 2014

RPiSoC is a PSoC 5LP-based electronics development platform that allows your software to interact with the physical world in a way that emphasizes power, flexibility, and accessibility.

RPiSoC Board

It started life as a senior project for Robert Barron and Brian Bradley at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, who have now formed Embedit and launched the platform on Kickstarter. If you're interested in getting one just sign up as a backer. You can get a plain board for a $39 pledge or, for just $5 more you can get the board plus a Cypress Miniprog3 programmer/debugger kit. That's great deal because those kits are usually $90!

RPiSoC can be used as a standalone embedded board for instrumentation, data acquisition, and mixed signal projects. But it really gets interesting when you hook it up to a Raspberry Pi. The PSoC 5LP makes RPiSoC much more than a typical fixed-function expansion board; providing access to PWMs, high resolution DACs and ADCs, Opamps, DSP, Pmod and Arduino Shield interfaces, and much more! You can replace a bunch of peripheral boards with a single RPiSoC.

I really recommend taking a look at this new platform. Robert and Brian just launched the kickstarter project and there are some nice videos of the platform in action. I particularly like the face recognition one but there are a number of others on YouTube.

[re-printed from ARM Developer Community]

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Aug 18, 2014

The RPiSoC is a development platform which brings the power of the PSoC to the Raspberry Pi. Due to the integration of discrete analog and programmable logic, this platform is well equipped for embedded system applications, instrumentation, data acquisition, and mixed signal projects. A large focus of the RPiSoC is its ability to connect directly to the Raspberry Pi and enhance its capabilities in the embedded space. With the two boards combined, various analog and digital peripherals are easily accessed by the Pi, allowing for endless possibilities for advanced projects. These onboard peripherals include PWMs, high resolution DACs and ADCs, Opamps, DSP, Pmod and Arduino Shield interfaces, and much more.
 
The RPiSoC team will be showing off a few projects you can make with their board, both with and without the Raspberry Pi. These include a computer vision enabled head tracking camera, an oscilloscope and function generator, a simple digital logic design lab, and an automated twitter feed.
 
 

Presenters: Robert Barron & Brian Bradley

Robert Barron received his Bachelor s degree in Computer and Systems Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. His passion for embedded systems and programming has been two of his hobbies for several years. Robert has experience ranging from working for Firebrand Innovations to implement a smart video conferencing system, developing Android apps, and creating an automated projection mapping system.
Brian Bradley received his Bachelor s degree in Electrical Engineering. His concentration is in Robotics and Control, but embedded applications have always been a devoted hobby of his. He has worked on improvement of tactile technologies for application in the field of virtual surgery, developed a small scale Brain Computer Interface for planar movement of a six-degree-of-freedom robotic arm, and has been mentioned in Make Magazine for a Raspberry Pi project made in his spare time.

 

Details

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Aug 15, 2014

Alan Hawse, Executive Vice President of Software, will be filming a new set of videos for Cypress at the end of the month.  Hopefully you've gotten a chance to watch the PSoC Creator 101 videos Alan made earlier this year. He would like your suggestions on what videos he should make next.  


Please take a few minutes to let Alan know you're ideas (or to vote on some of our team's proposals).  The survey is online at http://goo.gl/WQkHKE.  

 

All survey participants have the option to provide an email address at the end of the survey to enter a drawing for a chance to win one of 25 PSoC CY8CKIT-049 development kits.
 

Our goal is to provide you with a broad series of high-quality tutorial videos (without the marketing hype) that can help you become a PSoC expert.

 

The survey will close this evening (8/25/14) and notifications will be set to winners of the CY8CKIT-049 boards next week.  Thank you for all of the feedack!  Alan has a lot to keep him busy both in this video session and the next. 

 

Design the way you think with PSoC Creator.

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