• Simplified Chinese
  • Japanese
  • Korean
   


Aug 27, 2010


I feel that there is lot of USB related reading material out there – almost an information deluge - but there are few that encompass some of the key points of this protocol. I’m trying to compile here a few articles that I used to understand some of the basics. Hope this list helps!  

1. USB in a nutshell (By Craig Peacock) - http://www.beyondlogic.org/usbnutshell/usb1.shtml
This is an old article (written in 2002) – but describes the protocol in a lot of detail. May be a little too deep for some – I had found it very useful to understand what really goes inside a USB pipe

2. Upgrading Embedded Design Firmware via USB (By Rakesh Reddy) – http://www.eetimes.com/design/other/4026877/Upgrading-Embedded-Design-Firmware-via-USB
This goes a little deeper into the embedded design with USB for those who are not satisfied with the first article above!

3. Common USB Development Mistakes – You Don’t Have To Make Them All Yourself! – (By Steve Kolokowsky and Trevor Davis) http://uk.farnell.com/images/en/ede/pdf/usb_dev_mistake.pdf
This is a very handy article for embedded designers starting off with USB

4.  USB Technology: Multi-TT Hub Goes Head-to-Head With Single-TT – (By Patrick Schmid for Tom’s Hardware) - http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/usb-technology,677.html
Don’t go by the title. Most of us have used a USB hub at some point in our lives. This article – written back in 2003, gives a good understanding on how a USB hub works!


5. Increase the USB performance of your handset design (By Steve Kolokowsky) - http://www.eetimes.com/design/other/4016183/Increase-the-USB-performance-in-your-handset-design?pageNumber=1
Now that 90% of world’s handset devices (>1.3Billion handsets sold every year) have a USB port, most popularly used for charging and data transfer – this article written in 2006 is very much ahead of its time.

6. Making USB Flash Drives Secure (By Anant Jhawar)
Great read on how the most common USB device around (the flash drives / USB sticks / thumb drives – or whatever you call them J ) can be made more scure

8. USB3.0 – The Next-Generation Interconnect (By Ashwini Govindaraman)
http://electronicdesign.com/article/digital/usb_3_0_the_next_generation_interconnect.aspx
Good article on some of the basics of USB3.0

I'm writing after a long hiatus! Feels like a first entry. Need to keep this moving at a more constant rate. Thank you all for being patient!!

Rating: (4/5) by 2 users
Comments (0)
Feb 19, 2010

A print ad in 'Spirit' - Southwest Airline's inflight magazine - caught my eye. Quite predictably, my colleague and I flicked a copy .. for keeps. A few discussions later this USB ad warranted a blog post. 

It is always a pleasant surprise to see the developer community (USB-IF in this case) attempt to make the world more aware of the underlying technologies that drive our day to day gadgets. The fact is overwhelming - 6 BILLION USB devices! Thats more than the # of phones in the world. Thats even more than the # of toothbrushes in the world (last I know there are only 5B of these)! 

I like the clarity of message - buzz words like charging, plug and play, ease-of-use are mentioned explicitly to highlight why USB has been so successful. Also, I like the strategy of promoting USB2.0 (Hi-Speed) and USB3.0 (SuperSpeed) which is the next wave in USB development. 

Skeptics would argue "who is this really addressed to?" They may say - A layperson might just flip through the page and an engineer might find it too 'marketing oriented'.

Regardless of the downsides - I think its a great attempt. Jeff Ravencraft (president of the USB-IF) and team - I applaud your efforts. The USB ecosystem (which includes Cypress as a dominant player) only stands to gain from this.

Rating: (4.4/5) by 7 users
Comments (0)
Feb 02, 2010

A friend once told me that USB is genius. “You can charge your device while transferring data. Brilliant!”

This was before Apple made connecting your handheld to a computer via a USB cable (called ‘sideloading’) for transfering media, an everyday household activity. Over the last few years, USB has slowly but strongly emerged as the de-facto connectivity standard for all devices – especially mobile handhelds. People download small multi-media files (ringtones, songs) over their wireless networks, and with 3G/4G, this will continue. But the content is getting bigger (HD movies are now >4GB). Storage on the handheld is increasing as well (32GB SD cards are easily available). It may take hours to download this type of content over the air and forget about your battery life or the network connection . USB is keeping up with this, and with USB3.0, I have no doubt that it will be the connectivity standard of choice. I found it very interesting to see that the topic de jour last week – Apple's introduction of its new iPad highlighted the fact that it "syncs over USB just like an iPhone or iPod".

Cypress is at a unique position in this with its USB leadership. Cypress has shipped over 1 Billion USB controllers since 1996, when it was one of the first entrants in the USB market. CypressWest Bridge peripheral controller is the world’s fastest sideloading solution and has enabled millions of handsets with “1GB in 1 minute” sideloading performance.

The simplicity of connecting my phone to the computer for a quick ‘synch and go’, and the flexibility of charging it while I drive to work everyday, always remind me of my friend’s remark about USB – “Brilliant!”.

Rating: (4.3/5) by 6 users
Comments (0)
ALL CONTENT AND MATERIALS ON THIS SITE ARE PROVIDED "AS IS". CYPRESS SEMICONDUCTOR AND ITS RESPECTIVE SUPPLIERS MAKE NO REPRESENTATIONS ABOUT THE SUITABILITY OF THESE MATERIALS FOR ANY PURPOSE AND DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES AND CONDITIONS WITH REGARD TO THESE MATERIALS, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES AND CONDITIONS OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, TITLE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT OF ANY THIRD PARTY INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHT. NO LICENSE, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, BY ESTOPPEL OR OTHERWISE, IS GRANTED BY CYPRESS SEMICONDUCTOR. USE OF THE INFORMATION ON THIS SITE MAY REQUIRE A LICENSE FROM A THIRD PARTY, OR A LICENSE FROM CYPRESS SEMICONDUCTOR.

Content on this site may contain or be subject to specific guidelines or limitations on use. All postings and use of the content on this site are subject to the Terms and Conditions of the site; third parties using this content agree to abide by any limitations or guidelines and to comply with the Terms and Conditions of this site. Cypress Semiconductor and its suppliers reserve the right to make corrections, deletions, modifications, enhancements, improvements and other changes to the content and materials, its products, programs and services at any time or to move or discontinue any content, products, programs, or services without notice.

 
 
FB1.png Twitter1.png linkedin youtube